Racism 101 Questions and Answers: How Can Blacks Support Their Community When There Are Black-To-Black Crimes?

What is Racism 101?

  • We created Racism 101 to help our audience host their own stimulating discussions about race, with a conversation “starter kit” and comprehensive anti-racist resource guides to inform and educate. To answer these questions, we’ve assembled a panel of Angelenos willing to answer so people don’t have to ask their friends, or even strangers.

We solicited questions from our audience – awkward, hard to ask, even silly questions – that they might have wanted to ask people different from them but were too shy, embarrassed or scared to ask. .

We received a question on how BIPOC can help each other when they are victims of violence from other BIPOCs in their communities.

Q: “In what ways do BIPOC folx show solidarity and tackle lateral violence? “

What is lateral violence? It is violence against your peer group perpetuated through your peer group. In the case of BIPOC, it would be violence directed against other BIPOCs. A simple example is black versus black crime.

The Australian Human Rights Commission studied lateral violence with regard to the country’s indigenous and aboriginal peoples, who endured disease, segregation and genocide resulting from European colonialism:

Lateral violence is ‘trying to feel powerful in a situation of powerlessness’, and it is a term often used to describe the types of violence perpetrated within subjugated groups. ”

Groups that have historically been discriminated against are more likely to target their own community in an attempt to feel powerful, as they themselves feel powerless at the bottom of the social hierarchy.

It’s a vicious circle. What can be done to support those affected by violence and repair the systems that help perpetuate the feelings of helplessness that contributed to it in the first place?

How our Racism 101 panelists reacted


Q: “In what ways do BIPOC folx show solidarity and tackle lateral violence?

Donna, a local artist who proudly identifies as Black and queer, describes how BIPOC can pitch to support his community, especially Blacks, who are affected by violence stemming from racism, towards other Blacks.

“Can BIPOC support others in their communities? Yes, doing everything we can. But the truth is, it requires a complete overhaul and restructuring of almost every tenet of American institutions to actually see lasting generational changes. ”

Read from Donna:

“That’s a great question. I’ve never answered it outside of a relationship with the police. That being said, lateral violence is proportional to all races. People kill each other. And lateral violence or violence towards each other is tragic.

“Can BIPOC support others in their communities? Yes, doing everything we can. We are creating anti-violence organizations. We participate in mentoring programs. The artists produce songs with appeals for peace, lamenting fallen friends, to draw attention to the violence. Community organizers, mayors and pastors organize community gatherings in cities plagued by violence, and there are countless after-school programs.

“Organizations like the NAACP and Urban League offer a variety of services to at-risk youth. We try to create opportunities for people at risk or disenfranchised to help them imagine a world outside of their neighborhood or city – and where they fit into it.

“We are (trying) vote. We advocate for more help for mothers without vital resources like childcare.

“But the truth is, it requires a complete overhaul and restructuring of almost every tenet of American institutions to actually see lasting generational changes. BIPOC, especially Blacks and Bruns, grapples with the racism – and violence – that stems from systemic failures, trauma, the effects of poverty on underfunded families and communities.

“But, there is solidarity as communities come together to come forward because their lives matter. When we say Black Lives Matter, we are not just talking to white people, but to our black community. Nothing in life makes them feel like it’s important, and it’s a rare opportunity to see how valuable, beautiful and light their life is – and always will be.

“There is awareness, concerns, action taken and changes taking place. There are countless stories of people whose lives have been turned upside down because of other BIPOC members who have shown solidarity with their lives, their pain and given them hope. That’s really all we can do.

Hull describes herself as a proud black Armenian Angelena. She is adamant: while we aim to protect the BIPOC community, no one is left behind.

“It is a conversion that we must continue to have. If this movement is not intersectional, it is not a good movement.

She advocates for black trans women who she believes face the most violence.


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