Framework for improving services to children and youth launched by the regulator

A detailed review by head nurses identified “common themes” where trusts that struggle to achieve low marks for child and youth services may seek to improve.

Trusts that received poor ratings on child and youth services were urged to improve nursing staffing levels and their incident reporting and to learn from serious incidents.

“This framework gives trusts a clear overview of what good and exceptional care looks like and how it can be achieved.”

Ruth may

Health service providers have also been urged to improve the direction of child and youth services, following close scrutiny by the NHS Improvement.

In particular, every trust in England should develop a strategy to ensure that young patients are fully involved in the care they receive, to help reduce future problems, the regulator said.

Its nursing branch has conducted a review of the Quality of Care Commission reports for trusts that were rated “in need of improvement” or “insufficient” for child and youth services.

In the first such review, NHS Improvement reviewed just over 100 CQC reports from trusts with lower scores to “identify common themes of bad practice or areas for improvement.”

The review highlighted four main areas that appeared to be the ‘root cause of poor grades’ – staffing, serious incidents, leadership and strategy – noted the improvement in the NHS.

For example, low staffing levels were highlighted in 15 of the 20 CQC trust reports reviewed in the Midlands and East NHS region.

“Ensuring safe, efficient and high-quality services for children and young people must be a priority”

Ellen armistead

Nursing staffing levels were found to be lower than recommended in the most recent Royal College of Nursing guidelines in 13 and a high number of vacancies in medical staff were also found in three.

Per 2013 RCN guidelines, there should be at least two licensed pediatric nurses at all times in all inpatient and day care areas, and a minimum of 70: 30% enrolled to unregistered staff.

In addition, 13 of the reports from the Midlands and East found a ‘bad culture’ of incident reporting or ‘inadequate processes’ for reporting to and learning from personnel involved in the incident. .

Meanwhile, 10 said staff did not have the appropriate training or skills to take on their role and nine cited a lack of strategy for children and youth, with four citing no executive officer for this group of people. age.

However, the regulator noted that even in trusts categorized as “in need of improvement” or “insufficient”, most child and youth services were rated “good” to be benevolent.

Following the assessment by the regulator’s chief nurses, they also developed a new framework for improving services for children and young people which was launched today by NHS Improvement.

The executive pointed out “what went wrong with clear indications of what they can do to address some of the underlying issues,” a spokeswoman for the regulator said.

The new document set out a “clear and concise” framework for trusts to follow and also included links to best practice examples that could help them on their “improvement journey,” she added.

For example, the framework stated that it was important for trusts to have “the right people with the right skills in the right place at the right time”.

He also cited improving incident reporting and learning from serious incidents, noting that trusts would only reduce the risk of similar events occurring by figuring out what went wrong and why.

In addition, he said the trusts should “use” their executive child and youth manager, which they are now required to have, to ensure that the needs of children and youth are a “priority.”

Meanwhile, the trust’s executive child and youth leader is expected to lead the development of a strategy to ensure patients are fully involved in their care and service development.

Nursing shortage is regulator’s “top priority”

Source: Kate Stanworth

Ruth may

Ruth May, executive director of nursing at NHS Improvement, said: ‘Services for children and young people are essential to the health of the nation, if we take good care of the younger generation it will reduce the problems they face. , as well as the NHS. in the future.”

She said: “This framework, developed following a detailed review of CQC reports by NHS Improvement, gives trusts a clear overview of what good and exceptional care looks like and how it can be achieved.”

Ellen Armistead, Deputy Chief Hospital Inspector of CQC, said: “Ensuring safe, efficient and high-quality services for children and youth must be a priority.

Ellen armistead

Ellen armistead

Ellen armistead

“We know from our inspections that many hospital trusts provide quality or exceptional care to children and youth, but that there is marked room for improvement in those where we have identified problems,” a- she declared.

She added: “We welcome the development of this framework and hope that the trusts will use it, as well as the findings of the CQC inspection reports to help them take action to improve the quality of the services they provide. provide children and young people in the future. “

Common topics that seem to be causing bad grades:

  • Nursing staffing levels: it is important that trusts have the right staff with the right skills in the right place at the right time
  • Incident reporting and lessons learned from serious incidents: Trusts will only reduce the risk of similar events occurring by determining what went wrong and why
  • Leadership: Trusts should use the role of their executive child and youth manager, which they are now required to have, to ensure that the needs of children and youth are a priority for their organization
  • Strategy for children and youth: The executive manager for children and youth of the trust should lead the development of a strategy to ensure that patients are fully involved in their care and the development of the service


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