As people research different ways to connect, visual artist Kari Carvey has noticed that there is a resurgence of interest in the lost art of pen on paper.

Kari Carvey writes at her home in Calgary on April 6, 2021.

Sarah B Groot / The Globe and Mail

As people search for meaningful ways to connect during the pandemic, visual artist Kari Carvey has noticed a resurgence of interest in the lost art of pen on paper.

Unable to communicate face to face, people take the time to get something in the mail, she said, writing personal notes, letters and cards that tell loved ones ‘you are thinking of them’ .

Ms. Carvey’s love for writing began with stationery and pens.

Sarah B Groot / The Globe and Mail

Ms Carvey has also seen an increase in discussions about fountain pens and inks as people find more opportunities to write and take care of journals.

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“There’s a lot of organization that comes with handwriting, writing things down, and using different colors and fonts. “

Ms Carvey, who has been fascinated by stationery and pens since she was a girl, estimates that she has amassed a collection of a few hundred pens as well as pencils and journals.

Sarah B Groot / The Globe and Mail

Her own love of writing began with stationery and pens. “I became obsessed with the police. I remember having Letraset and Geotype, looking at all the different fonts and learning the different names. When she watched TV or movies, she began to identify the fonts on the signage.

She started practicing the fonts, taking each letter of the alphabet and drawing them over and over again. Eventually, she thought she could make her own – and she did.

Ms Carvey keeps a diary displaying one of her handmade font styles. She has spent hours creating and perfecting her font styles.

Sarah B Groot / The Globe and Mail

Older generations may be more familiar with letter writing, but Ms. Carvey is seeing more and more young people making it a hobby.

“There are a lot of people who didn’t know they had a passion for pens and when they find out that, ‘Hey, this pen is really old fashioned’ or ‘When I was a kid I was fascinated by what my grandpa used to use, ‘it kinda snaps.

For her, part of the appeal lies in the permanence of the act. While we can completely forget what someone says or what we hear, she said, the written word is indelible.

Ms. Carvey enjoys creating new and unique fonts.

Sarah B Groot / The Globe and Mail

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